James Scott Mann III

James Scott Mann III passed away. A visitation will be held from 6 to 8 p.m., Wednesday, August 29, 2018 at Earthman Bellaire Funeral Home, 4525 Bissonnet St. There will be a funeral service 2 p.m., Thursday, August 30, 2018 at Grace Bible Church with a reception to follow at 3 p.m., 6325 Hurst St. The interment will be held 11:30 a.m., Friday, August 31, 2018 at Magnolia Cemetery, Woodville, Texas.

To meet James Scott Mann III was all it took to admire him, to instantaneously have a friend. That was Scott Mann, thoughtfulness personified, a family man with a legacy of great deeds and unconditional love.

After three years of complications related to pulmonary fibrosis, Scott, a devout Christian, peacefully ascended Friday to be home with the Lord.

Scott, born on Oct. 9, 1940, did everything he could to go extra miles in this life and contribute to the betterment of people and places he held dear, and that list was thicker than an old phone book.

Scott had a lung transplant in December 2016 and spent extensive time residing with family outside Philadelphia before and after the miraculous operation. The transplant, however, caused vulnerabilities and bouts with infections that consequentially took too great a toll.

Yet, right up to the hours before he passed quietly at home at 6:11 p.m., Scott remained stoic, engaging and sensitive to the feelings of others, true to the certainty of his eternal spiritual life.

Scott, born in Beaumont, Texas, and the son of James Scott Mann II “Doc” and Evelyn Mann, was raised in Baytown. He was the older brother of beloved sisters Lynn and Jan, each of whom preceded him in passing. As kids, Scott and his siblings spent many picturesque nights in East Texas on the porch of Big Daddy and Mama Mann, sleeping under the stars.

Blessed with purposeful determination, Scott learned the importance of hard work done well, roping cattle and delivering calves as a bona fide cowboy during summers at the Dinn Ranch in South Texas.

Popular and revered by many classmates, Scott was a football star and prom king at Baytown Lee High Scool.

When Darrell Royal took over as football coach at the Unversity of Texas in 1957, Scott was among his first prized recruits. Scott lettered as an offensive and defensive lineman, making a crucial stop in the 1960 Bluebonnet Bowl vs. Alabama. Scott and Coach Royal had such mutual respect they formed a friendship that lasted a lifetime and, rightfully, picks up again on fields of gold.

While attending UT, Scott, a member of the Sigma Chi fraternity, met and went on to marry Dene Hofheinz, daughter of the legendary Judge Roy Hofheinz. Scott and Dene’s marriage produced two tremendous sons, Mark in 1963 and Dinn in 1965.

Scott gained unprecedented perspective in witnessing ways the Judge, with wisdom and ingenuity, navigated complex issues to orchestrate brilliant developments in Houston’s proud history. Although Scott and Dene did not remain married beyond eight years, they went on to find true happiness, respectively.

During his time in New York City, Scott founded Market Data Systems. The company created some of the first automated reports for publicly traded stocks and produced related television programming. Among clients of that business were some of the top hedge funds in the nation.

In 1971, Scott met Marvel, who would become his faithful, loyal and loving wife of 46 years. Their son James Scott Mann IV, “Jase,” was born in 1979. Soon after, Mark and Dinn moved to Austin to join their Dad, Marvel and Jase.

Together, they enjoyed a large family of aunts, uncles, cousins and grandparents. Family activities included sailing, skiing, hunting, fishing and camping. Scott taught each of the boys to drive and got a thrill out of watching them compete in organized sports.

When Scott was asked how all three of his sons became such fine young men, he replied: “Keep them on the front row of the church.”

Mark, Dinn and Jase have a brotherly bond that made Scott beam with delight whenever he’d speak of how they -- and their families -- consistently are there for one another. The family, as captured often through Scott’s signature tripod moments, had authentic kinship -- and the pictures to prove it.

Back when the boys were under the same roof in the early 1980s, Scott became an advisor to Texas Gov. Mark White and was a member of the Texas Economic Counsel and contributed to the development of Sematech, helping pave the way for Austin to become the technology hub it is today. Scott impressively created diversified success in energy, finance, tech and real estate.

His work life in the mid-to-late ‘80s grew complicated in the wake of shifts that led to disproportionately ominous clouds, yet Scott emerged from that period with optimism, emboldened to approach life with humility, honesty and perseverance.

Scott would dedicate himself to helping others find desirable results, prioritizing opportunities based on people and ideas, potential outcomes and timeframes. This was a man with an impeccable sense of timing.

Scott saved the lives of three people in scenes straight out of “It’s A Wonderful Life,” yet he never made a big deal out of those heroics. He also saved people in this way: Scott’s love and advice steered many toward time-sensitive good choices at vital crossroads.

He was a man of great faith who loved Marvel, his “Sunshine,” and his family deeply. Scott cherished the times they had together, having conversation, a meal, taking in a movie or sporting event, mainly football or the Astros.

Anything he’d invest time in had to pass a certain smell test: Positive quality; funny but not raunchy; relevant lessons.

There was no such thing as a stranger to Scott. Anybody with whom he’d cross paths would begin with the benefit, not the doubt. He was extremely thankful for his true friends, especially the so-called Breakfast Club. Together, they grew wiser, lifted each other up, knew how to solve all the world’s problems -- and, most important, where to get the best migas and chilaquiles in town.

Scott loved the music of Don Williams and The High­waymen, to name a couple, and generally liked music that struck a triumphant tone.

Recently, in the last few weeks of his experience in this time and place, Scott explained, “I’ve had a great life, and I’m looking forward to my next life. I’m in the Lord’s hands now.”

Scott didn’t just have a firm grip literally. He had one spiritually. His time on Earth was precious. Now? The whole world is in His hands, and it lasts forever.

The survivors of James Scott Mann, III. His loving and devoted wife of 46 years, Marvel. His sons Mark (Wife: Kendal), Dinn (Wife: Betsy), and James (Jase) Scott Mann, IV (Wife: Julia) His grand­children: Caroline, Annabeth, Holly, Roy, Irene, Jake , Austin , and an extended family that brought delight to Scott all of his days.

A visitation will be held from 6 to 8 p.m., Wednesday, August 29, 2018 at Earthman Bellaire Funeral Home, 4525 Bissonnet St. There will be a funeral service 2 p.m., Thursday, August 30, 2018 at Grace Bible Church with a reception to follow at 3 p.m., 6325 Hurst St. The interment will be held 11:30 a.m., Friday, August 31, 2018 at Magnolia Cemetery, Woodville, Texas.

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